MYP 6 Science - Chemistry

MYP 6.1.2: Scientific apparatus

Objectives:

  • To introduce and familiarise the students with the apparatus and equipment used in the study of chemical science and its correct use.
  • To know the S.I. units of length, volume, mass, time, temperature.
  • To understand that inaccuracy is an unavoidable consequence of measurement.
  • To know how to draw scientific diagrams.

Activity 1- Worksheet SR page72

The students should classify each piece as apparatus for measuring, containing, supporting, delivering liquid, heating, testing etc. This may be done as a class discussion.

Student Activity

Tabulate the information by drawing each piece of apparatus in the exercise book in 2 dimensions (ruler and pencil) with labels and its purpose.

Example:    
Apparatus Name Use Sizes
Conical flask Containing liquids 50cm3 100cm3 250cm3 500cm3
Beaker Containing and pouring (delivering) liquids 50cm3 100cm3 250cm3 500cm3

The lesson could be completed by selection of apparatus from a choice and explaining its purpose. The students may be instructed for example to collect 50cm3 of water in a 250cm3 conical flask.

Essential measuring instrumentation apparatus

  • Electronic mass balance
  • Measuring cylinder
  • Thermometer
  • Stop-watch

For each of these the units of measurement and the limits of accuracy should be discussed.

It is helpful to compare readings taken by different groups to introduce instrumental tolerance and experimental accuracy.

Experiment

  1. Measure out 25 cm3 of sodium hydroxide solution (2M) record its temperature.
  2. Measure out 25 cm3 of hydrochloric acid solution (2M) record its temperature.
  3. Mix the two solutions together into a polystyrene beaker supported in a 250 ml glass beaker. Stir thoroughly and record the highest temperature attained.
  4. Perform the experiment three more times, not forgetting to record ALL data.

Experiment

  1. Measure out 25 cm3 of sodium thiosulphate solution (0.02M).
  2. Measure out 5 cm3 of hydrochloric acid solution (2M) .
  3. Mix the two solutions together into a glass test tube and start timing.
  4. Record how long it takes for the solution to become opaque.

Perform the experiment three more times, not forgetting to record ALL data.


Resources:

Spotlight Science 7: p8

Spotlight Science 7: p172-175


 
previous page
next page
Copyright: 2013 Isis Publication